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There is a silver lining to chemo, a broken face and a heart attack

By   /  December 9, 2013  /  Comments Off on There is a silver lining to chemo, a broken face and a heart attack

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37132ed5f6e8480b8a949ce187f8125cThere’s a silver lining to chemo. Don’t get me wrong- chemo sucks. The nausea, the velcro feel of my bald head, the burning that’s not quite heartburn, and the fear of the nerve damage yet to set in. And don’t get me started on the feeling of running at 5% of normal power. Yet even though it is quite rotten, I feel blessed by it. Because going through this has shown me that life is full of so many wonderful people. (Here’s a previous post on Rachel’s illness in case you missed it.)

It’s something we hear so often, that we are so lucky to have the family and friends we have. To count your blessings, to appreciate each day. I did all that before this started, but I could not fully comprehend life’s richness then.

Here's what Troy shared On Saturday after he got home from the Hospital

Here’s what Troy shared On Saturday after he got home from the Hospital

To top off the chances to count blessings, Kathy has broken her face. Then Troy had a heart attack. [Are these the three strikes at On Pasture?]

There is so much pain in what happens to friends and family. My heart ached at the news of Troy. When Kathy told me about her face, my cheek throbbed. But when we realize how lucky we are to have  friends and family around us, even as we hurt for them, or they hurt for us, we see the silver lining. And maybe that’s a reason to get up in the morning.

But the truth is, we’re struggling here.  The On Pasture team has taken some big health hits, and what they’ve pointed out is that without a paid staff, even a minimally paid staff, it’s hard to keep this up.

We know that there are over 12,000 of you out there reading at least 2 articles per week.  A little over 100 of you have joined the On Pasture Community with support ranging from $1 to $125.  That’s a good start, but you can do the math yourselves and figure that it’s not enough to get us an admin assistant to help us out when we’re broken or sick.

It was never our thought to make loads of money by writing an online grazing magazine.  We just knew that you need information translated into steps you can use right away, and that we could provide that service to you.  We know how to find the information you need, we know how to write up the articles, and we’re getting more and more authors to contribute to the knowledge pool.  What we don’t know is whether we’re approaching this the right way to make On Pasture a sustainable venture.

So what do you think?  How do we make On Pasture sustainable?  How do we make it possible for you to contribute to this growing community in a way that works best for you?  We really want to know, but we don’t want you to feel on the spot.  So if you click here, you’ll go to a on question survey where you can leave your ideas without having to leave your name.  Or, if you prefer, you can send us a little support too.  Just head over to Membership and find a level you like.

SILVERLININGAnd in case you’re wondering about that whole silver lining thing – you really are part of our silver lining.  Knowing that you’re out there reading and realizing that we really can make a difference in our own small way, that keeps us getting up in the morning and getting On Pasture up on the web.

Thanks!

Rachel and Kathy

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  • Published: 4 years ago on December 9, 2013
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  • Last Modified: December 9, 2013 @ 2:14 pm
  • Filed Under: The Scoop

About the author

editor and contributor

Rachel's interest in sustainable agriculture and grazing has deep roots in the soil. She's been following that passion around the world, working on an ancient Nabatean farm in the Negev, and with farmers in West Africa's Niger. After returning to the US, Rachel received her M.S. and Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from the University of Maryland. For her doctoral research, Rachel spent 3 years working with Maryland dairy farmers using management intensive grazing. She then began her work with grass farmers, a source of joy and a journey of discovery.

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