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New Articles Coming January 7 – But Here Are Links to Great Articles to Read Until Then

By   /  December 23, 2013  /  Comments Off on New Articles Coming January 7 – But Here Are Links to Great Articles to Read Until Then

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We’re raring to go again now that we’ve had some time off so look forward to a great issue next Tuesday.  But until then, there’s plenty to entertain and inform you from our last 9 months of publication.  Here’s just a sampling of what you can find with a few clicks of your mouse.

Troy shows the poster created for this project.  It wouldn't have been possible without the help of many farmers and a great team made up of

Troy shows the poster created for the project that resulted in the free grazing charts. It wouldn’t have been possible without the help of many farmers and a great team made up of

Grazing Management

We’ve got free grazing charts, and tips for planning your grazing season using them.

Dave Scott did a great series on managing grazing on irrigated pasture.

Or maybe you just want to watch a few videos to review some basics.  Here you go:

We also did some great pieces on managing livestock around water, with a little about new regulations, impacts of livestock on water quality, and the results of studies about cattle grazing and clean water on public lands.

There’s plenty more in this category, so have fun exploring!

Turning Sunlight Into Money Via Livestock

The goal for pasture-based producers is to sustainably convert sunlight to net cash income. Understanding how plants grow makes it easier.

Pasture Health

To keep your pastures healthy you need to know something about how plants grow.  Ed Rayburn did three great pieces on this topic:

Soil is like cake. They both have layers.

Soil is like cake. They both have layers.

On Pasture soil articles have been picked up and published by other magazines because they’re so informative and easy to read.  Here are just a few of them:

You know those things you call weeds?  Well, they actually might be great alternative forages.  Check out the benefits of what you’ve got!

We’ve also written about more standard forages that some folks are adding to their pastures like radishes, summer annualsand red clover.

We sprinkled in videos and other interesting things, so scroll through and pick out what tickles you!

Livestock

From understanding behavior, to changing behavior so animals eat weeds, this is a really rich category of On Pasture articles.  Just click on the category and see what we’ve got for you.  We’re sure you’ll find something of interest!

deathandtaxes2Money Matters

Our authors have shared the numbers on small farm and large farm egg-onomics and the best handbook you could imagine on raising veal.  There’s something on Estate taxes and Tips for Transferring the Farm to the Next Generation.  Meg Grzeskiewicz did a great series on the ins and outs of pasture leasing to build your farm business.

Consider This

Calamari on one side of the plate, sliced hog rectums on the other.  Which is which?

Calamari on one side of the plate, sliced hog rectums on the other. Which is which?

Having our minds jostled a bit with some interesting or entertaining thoughts can be fun.  So that’s why we include “Consider This” articles every week.  We’ve written about moose farmingWorm Dancing, iron disease, eating bugs and bones and ice creamgrass fed music, Sna-Koil, and using Pork Bung to make artificial Calamari.

Consider a stroll through our Consider This archives.  You never know what you’ll find!

What ever you do over the next 2 weeks, we hope you’re enjoying your holiday season and we look forward to seeing you again on January 7!

Thanks for reading!

Rachel and Kathy

P.S.  Need something more to read?  Our contributors have written some GREAT books!  Check them out here.

 

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  • Published: 3 years ago on December 23, 2013
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  • Last Modified: January 2, 2014 @ 9:41 am
  • Filed Under: The Scoop

About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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