OrganicValley726x88
Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  The Scoop  >  Current Article

Punching a gift horse in the mouth

By   /  August 11, 2014  /  Comments Off on Punching a gift horse in the mouth

    Print       Email

My husband and I have three kids. Two sons and a daughter. Two boys, and a girl. They are perfect children. Which means that they are at times, so kind and helpful, we sit back aghast that these well behaved children are ours.

And then there are the other times, when one son walks up to the other and punches him. When asked something along the lines of “WHAT THE HECK WERE YOU THINKING???” the answer is some version of the entirety of the following: “I didn’t do it. He deserved it. It didn’t hurt.”

photo 1Um, I saw it. There’s no reason to hit him. And I think it did hurt, at least a little.

“I hate him.”

“He’s stupid.”

But there they are curled up together, laughing. Sleeping together in a pile, like puppies. Only willing to do something scary if the other comes along.

Today, they are off at a playdate, sitting next to each other playing Lego something or another with a friend.  The friend has a sister, but no brother. He wishes he had a brother so very much. His sister wishes she had a sister, an older one. (Younger ones get into your stuff. If you are the younger one, the world is yours!)

The moments and days they appreciate each other are beautiful.  They do recognize the gift that they have in each other.

And then they punch it in the mouth.

    Print       Email
  • Published: 2 years ago on August 11, 2014
  • By:
  • Last Modified: August 7, 2014 @ 3:43 pm
  • Filed Under: The Scoop

About the author

editor and contributor

Rachel's interest in sustainable agriculture and grazing has deep roots in the soil. She's been following that passion around the world, working on an ancient Nabatean farm in the Negev, and with farmers in West Africa's Niger. After returning to the US, Rachel received her M.S. and Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from the University of Maryland. For her doctoral research, Rachel spent 3 years working with Maryland dairy farmers using management intensive grazing. She then began her work with grass farmers, a source of joy and a journey of discovery.

Print

You might also like...

santa-reading

The Gift That Keeps on Giving – For the Person Who Has Everything

Read More →