Print
Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Livestock  >  Goats  >  Current Article

Small Ruminant Toolbox Now Available

By   /  September 22, 2014  /  Comments Off on Small Ruminant Toolbox Now Available

No, it’s not a toolbox for goats and sheep. They don’t have thumbs! Better than that – it’s a toolbox of information to help sheep and goat producers prosper.

    Print       Email

The National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) has compiled manuals, powerpoint presentations, videos and more into a “Toolbox” for small ruminant producers and educators.  It’s a collection of practical, proven materials covering a wide variety of topics, including pasture and herd management, marketing, pest management, quality of life and whole-farm sustainability.

The Toolbox includes the 978 page Small Ruminant Resource Manual.  You can download it for free and read it with Adobe Reader version 6 or later, by heading over to the Small Ruminant Toolbox Page.  Just click to get there.

The Toolbox includes the 978 page Small Ruminant Resource Manual. You can download it for free and read it with Adobe Reader version 6 or later, by heading over to the Small Ruminant Toolbox Page. Just click to get there.

This re-issue of the toolbox that was created by Linda Coffey of NCAT and a team of goat and sheep specialists now includes a 60-page Small Ruminant Sustainability Checksheet to help farmers adapt their practice to the changing realities of the marketplace and their farm.  It is the centerpiece of the toolbox, and was a critical missing piece before the project started, according to Coffey.  “Although the whole-farm planning is important for success, the topic is not typically covered in sheep and goat production workshops.”

Part of the Power Point presentations includes the Tennessee Master Meat Goat Producer Program, which was launched four years ago by Tennessee State University Small Ruminant Extension specialist An Peischel, to aid producers in improving production management skills and increase profitability. “Getting the kind of information out to Extension agents, students and farmers that is reliable and of good quality is extremely important,” said Peischel, adding “It’s easy to do a search on the Internet, but to find exactly what you are looking for from a reliable source is challenging. This Small Ruminant Toolbox provides those quality educational resources all in one place.”

Especially for AgentsThe toolbox is also serves as a resource for extension and county agents and others charged with helping producers find the information they need to be successful.  Will Getz, professor and Extension specialist at Fort Valley State University, says “The Small Ruminant Toolbox and the workshops we’ve conducted have been one of our most successful endeavors for small ruminant production and management.”

Steve Jones, a small ruminant specialist with the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service says “The greatest benefit of the Small Ruminant Toolbox is exposing the producers to the research and applying that research on their farms. “For example, we conducted two on-farm demonstrations using forage brassicas as an alternative to feeding hay and supplement. We estimate that farmers saved $2 a head on average as a result of the on-farm demos. One farm in particular, so far has saved over $3,000 and the potential is there to save up to $15,000.”

Order your jump drive with the whole Toolbox on it via Paypal by clicking here.

Order your jump drive with the whole Toolbox on it via Paypal by clicking here.

The Small Ruminant Toolbox is available online at www.sare.org/ruminant-toolbox. You can also order a jump drive containing all the toolbox information.  The price is $5 each, plus $3 for shipping and handling. Buy it online through PayPal.  For bulk pricing, contact debbier@ncat.org or call 1 (800) 346-9140.

Want more information? Contact Linda Coffey at lindac@ncat.org or call ATTRA at 800-346-9140.

 

    Print       Email

About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

Print

You might also like...

A comparison of blood color from an animal with nitrate poisoning and a healthy animal.

Nitrate Awareness: Is Your Herd Safe?

Read More →