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How to Reduce Stress on the Farm and Ranch

By   /  June 1, 2015  /  Comments Off on How to Reduce Stress on the Farm and Ranch

It’s as easy as checking out On Pasture’s newest Underwriter!

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Moving goats with a truck.

Moving goats with a truck.

I used to own goats. And as you all know, goats get out. And when they’re out they do bad things, like dance on the roof of your neighbor’s car. Or you get calls from folks like, “Kathy, you need to come down to the base. The goats are out and they’re eating the general’s flowers.” That was a Saturday and my husband and I drove the 2 hours to the National Guard Training Facility where my herd of 50 goats was supposed to be working on building fire breaks. It was hot and dusty, and my husband was pretty sure that this was going to be another goat rodeo to get them back in. But my herd knew the routine and my truck. So when I showed up, they followed the truck as he drove it back to their pen, and I followed behind, herding them when they paused for another snack.

My goats taught me early on that getting all excited, yelling and running around, only reduced my chances that they’d go back in their pen easily. And that caused a lot of stress for me.  On the other hand, if I approached them calmly, positioned myself the right way, and walked from side to side, they’d head back where I needed them to be, and even be so helpful as to show me the break in the fence they’d escaped through.

It’s a lesson I carried with me when I started working with cattle. What the animals had taught me was reinforced by a workshop I took with Bud Williams in Texas some years back. It reinforced that by being quiet, paying attention to the animals, and approaching them in ways that corresponded with how they see the world, I could be a lot less stressed when it came to moving and working with livestock.

Richard McConnell and Tina Williams of Hand 'n Hand Livestock Solutions

Richard McConnell and Tina Williams of Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions

It’s a lesson that our newest Underwriters, Richard McConnell and Tina Williams have been sharing with farmers and ranchers, following in the footsteps of Tina’s father, Bud. They run Hand ‘n Hand Livestock Solutions, teaching stockmanship and the marketing techniques that Bud Williams described in his workshops. They’ve been with On Pasture since the beginning, advertising their services and workshops in the classifieds.  In fact, if you go there right now, you’ll find links to upcoming workshops, maybe even near you!

Underwriters make it possible for On Pasture to bring you new articles each week. We hope you’ll drop Richard and Tina a note to thank them for their support!

Thanks for reading!

Kathy and Rachel

P.S. In honor of our new underwriter, how about checking out some past pieces on Bud Williams work? Here you go:

Build a BudBox

 

Bud Boxes Beat Tubs

 

Save

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  • Published: 2 years ago on June 1, 2015
  • By:
  • Last Modified: June 30, 2016 @ 10:15 am
  • Filed Under: The Scoop

About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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