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Re-purposing the Brassiere

By   /  June 15, 2015  /  1 Comment

Have you ever wanted to see a Nobel Laureate with a bra on his head? Well, here’s video of three of them wearing bras as face masks. Its the result of some great outside-the-box thinking by a women who realized her bra could provide emergency protection in disasters like Chernobyl, 9/11, and Fukushima. We hope she’ll inspire you to think big too!

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At On Pasture, we think outside of the box. One of the things we like about you, dear reader, is that you do too! Sometimes that means thinking differently about things we use every day, ilk this story of a woman who thought big about underwear.

Ebra in actionAfter working with children affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, Dr. Elena Bodnar saw that a lot of folks were struggling with health issues that could possibly be averted in future crises. She looked around, and looked down. Her bra, she saw, could serve as not one, but two personal face masks. Working out the details with the help of her husband (ah, to have been at the dinner table conversations in their house!), she came up with a device that takes only 25 seconds to take off, and then put on. Wearing it as a face mask will decrease inhalation of potentially dangerous airborne particles. Depending on what style you or your face mask provider is wearing, you may also find that it’s a colorful look, too.

In this video, she demonstrated her big idea on other big thinkers. Observe a woman who realized that her brassiere could save lives. In the process, watch her attach her bra to the heads of 3 Nobel Laureates, protecting other brains that think outside the box. You can buy an Emergency Bra, too, and now, with an optional radiation sensor. Washing instructions are the same for normal bras, but take out the sensor before you run that through the machine.

If you’re a tablet reader, here’s your link. 

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About the author

editor and contributor

Rachel's interest in sustainable agriculture and grazing has deep roots in the soil. She's been following that passion around the world, working on an ancient Nabatean farm in the Negev, and with farmers in West Africa's Niger. After returning to the US, Rachel received her M.S. and Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from the University of Maryland. For her doctoral research, Rachel spent 3 years working with Maryland dairy farmers using management intensive grazing. She then began her work with grass farmers, a source of joy and a journey of discovery.

1 Comment

  1. Chip Hines says:

    Now I have to figure out which lady to buddy up with! I had better quit now as this will not die easily.

    Troy, I know you have something to say! And no fear.

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