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Trampled Grass = Soil Fertility

By   /  November 2, 2015  /  Comments Off on Trampled Grass = Soil Fertility

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In this video from Dave Scott’s series, Dave uses side by side pastures grazed short and long to demonstrate that if you leave grass behind, you’re not wasting it. You’re just setting that pasture up for quicker, better regrowth.  Keeping cover on the soil is also good for the soil microbes that help you create fertile soil for growing better forage.  This grazing management has meant that he’s increased his grazing days, and he’s reduced the need for adding nitrogen fertilizers.

Check it out and see why full recovery for your pastures is a great idea and makes things better all the way around.

Tablet readers, here’s your link.

KeepArticlesComingJoinThanks to ATTRA’s National Center for Appropriate Technology in Butte, Montana for making these videos available!

 

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About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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