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Ideas for Additions to Your Pasture Forages

By   /  January 30, 2017  /  No Comments

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This article first appeared in January of 2014. We hope these ideas from Jerry Doan will inspire you to consider what might work well in your pastures.

Jerry DoanWith all the cold and snow many of us have been having, wouldn’t it be nice if we could just step out of it all and take a quick trip to summer? Well, here’s our best effort at making that happen for you.

Check out this video from Ray Archuleta’s Vimeo Channel of a Burleigh County North Dakota NRCS and SWCD visit to the Blackleg ranch.  The ranch has been in the Doan family since 1882 and they currently run a cow calf, graze yearlings and run a hunting/agri-tourism business.  Little by little they’ve been grazing more intensively and adding to the diversity of their pastures so they can build organic matter and graze into the winter.

Their pasture mixture includes corn, soybeans, turnips, radish, millet, sunflowers, cowpea to serve the health of the graziers, as well as wildlife like pheasant and deer.  Strip grazing helps with hunting success, gives the cattle something to graze in the winter, and reduces the amount of hay they have to buy or put up.  Plus the visitors coming for horseback riding and agri-tourism love to see the pasture flowers.

Blackleg Ranch, Burleigh Co., ND from SC-NRCS & ESRI-SC Partnership on Vimeo.

natglc-logo-1Thanks to the National Grazing Lands Coalition for making this article possible. Click on over to see the great work they do for all of us. Thank them for supporting On Pasture by liking their facebook page.

 

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About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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