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Is My Charger Too Small For the Amount of Fence I Have?

By   /  October 16, 2017  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  No Comments

I’ve been asked a handful of times, “Is my multi wire set up too much stress for my fence charger?” Some manufactures rate their chargers in total linear length of wire, and some rate in single/multi wire, so it can be hard to figure out. So let’s look at an example: Let’s say you bought a […]

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A Change in Grazing Management Can Show Results Quickly

By   /  October 9, 2017  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  No Comments

If you ever thought, “Seeing the results of a change takes so long, I’m not sure it’s worth it,” take hope from this illustration from Jim of what can happen in just a couple years. Here is an illustration of managed grazing beginning to heal an overgrazed landscape in the Nebraska Sand Hills. On the […]

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Examples From a New York Farmer Heading to Year-Round Grazing

By   /  October 2, 2017  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  3 Comments

Are you thinking that you’d like to feed less and graze more during the winter? Here’s how this farmer is taking it on, from our October 2015 issue. Is year-round grazing possible in the rugged hill country of Steuben County? John Burns thinks so and is putting a lot of planning and effort to do […]

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Biodiversity Through Grazing Management

By   /  September 25, 2017  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  No Comments

Jim Gerrish demonstrates how he grazed to get biodiversity in his pastures, along with all the benefits of healthy soil, good animal performance, and improved wildlife habitat.

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Low on Forage? Early Weaning is a Good Option.

By   /  September 18, 2017  /  ARS, The Classic by NatGLC  /  2 Comments

Here’s something to think about this winter as you’re planning for next year’s weaning. Who knew that early weaned steers gain better?! That’s just one of the things ARS scientists found when they looked at early weaning as an alternative when forage is limited.

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