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The Poop on Dung Beetles

By   /  November 30, 2015  /  3 Comments

What would you say to a 95% decrease in horn flies thanks to dung beetles? They do that and a lot more for us. Here’s a list, plus instructions for capture traps so that you can add more beetles to your pastures if you don’t think you have enough.

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Troy Bishopp (the Grass Whisperer and On Pasture author) says that if he comes to visit your pasture
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About the author

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

3 Comments

  1. ben berlinger says:

    Nice article Kathy. Very informative and useful material. Keep up the good work!

  2. bill elkins says:

    Very interesting,but I just wonder how dung beetle survival after giving Ivermectin or similar Rx to an animal (or group thereof) is measured. Must be all done in laboratory? So n beetles(or their larvae?) per holding jar are given the drug, presumably mixed into poop?,and then counted until all die? But that’s hardly relevant to their mortality in pasture with treated cattle?

    • Kathy Voth says:

      I would guess that the method you’re surmising is not how they determine mortality rates. The folks doing this are scientists, like you, and thus certainly know techniques that would give them realistic numbers. If you really want to know how they figure this I’m sure we can find it with a quick search of the Internet.

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