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You’re Reading On Pasture Thanks to the National Grazing Lands Coalition

By   /  December 23, 2019  /  Comments Off on You’re Reading On Pasture Thanks to the National Grazing Lands Coalition

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As we close out 2019, I want to thank the National Grazing Lands Coalition (NatGLC) for all the support they’ve provided to On Pasture.

When Rachel and I started, we had no funding at all, just an idea that helping graziers be more profitable and sustainable was a worthwhile thing to do. We hoped that if we did a good job, readers would respond by sending in support at whatever level worked best for them. Some do, but it’s never been enough to keep On Pasture online.

That’s when NatGLC stepped in. Early on, NatGLC provided support to On Pasture by sponsoring our articles, making it possible for us to scrape by for a bit longer. Then, they brought Rachel and I to their 2015 conference in Dallas, where we were able to make connections with Natural Resources Conservation Service staff who encouraged us to apply for a Conservation Innovation Grant. Our application was successful, and the grant has provided the majority of the funding that keeps On Pasture online. So, we wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for NatGLC.

The Board and Advisors for the National Grazing Lands Coalition includes representatives from national organizations and farmers and ranchers. Click on over to see the folks representing you.

The National Grazing Lands Coalition has supported On Pasture because providing graziers with information and support is a key part of their mission. It was first established as the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative in June of 1991. The meeting was called by state and national agricultural, conservation, wildlife, and scientific organizations concerned about the declining level of technical assistance being provided by the Natural Resources Conservation Service to owners and managers of non-federal grazing lands. In response, they created the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative which has become the National Grazing Lands Coalition. It is a nationwide consortium of individuals and organizations working together to maintain and improve the management and the health of the Nation’s grazing lands, mostly private but also public. Their primary efforts include increasing the availability of qualified individuals to support graziers in their work, to support research and education that enhance grazing lands and their management, and increasing public understanding of the importance of grazing lands to our nation.

As part of their work, they sponsor a national grazing lands conference every other year. The next one will be December 6 – 9, 2021 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. But you don’t have to wait that long to get to know NatGLC and the work they do. This year, they’re sponsoring a ranch tour through the Nebraska Sandhills where you’ll be able to see the work that people just like you are doing to be successful stewards and profitable ranchers. The tour dates are June 14-17 starting in North Platte, Nebraska. If you’d like to learn more, you can sign up for their newsletter here.

So, during this season of giving, I am grateful for the support of the National Grazing Lands Coalition. They’ve made this possible and on behalf of the On Pasture community, I’m sending out a big THANKS!

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About the author

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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