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Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics on Sandhills Wet Meadows

November 29 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Free

Biography: Martha Mamo holds the John E. Weaver Professorship and currently serves as the Head of the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Mamo’s research is on nutrient cycling in low input rangeland ecosystem – evaluating grazing strategies and dung pat impact on soil C and N. Mamo provided leadership in the undergraduate curriculum and taught two core large enrollment soil courses for 15+ years. She received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. from Alabama A&M University, and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

Presentation: Decomposition of organic materials in grasslands leads to nutrient availability and nutrient cycling, which define quality and functionality of rangeland ecosystems. The inputs to the system include urine, dung, litter, and trampled vegetation and maybe influenced spatially and temporally by the grazing strategy. The nutrient cycling model of this grazed system as well as temporal changes in soil C will be reported for a grazing study conducted at the Barta Brothers Ranch in the meadows of the Sandhills region of Nebraska.

Podcast Interview: To hear Dr. Mamo preview her presentation, go to https://mediahub.unl.edu/media/17920

To learn more about the Center for Grassland Studies’ Fall Seminar Series or how you participate in-person or livestream, go to https://grassland.unl.edu/grassland-systems/fall-seminars-leu-lectures

Details

Date:
November 29
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Tags:
, , ,
Website:
https://grassland.unl.edu/grassland-systems/fall-seminars-leu-lectures

Venue

Center for Grassland Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
150 Keim Hall
Lincoln, NE 68583-0953 United States
Phone:
4024724101
Website:
https://grassland.unl.edu/

Organizer

Center for Grassland Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Phone:
402-472-4101
Email:
grassland@unl.edu
Website:
grassland.unl.edu
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