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Bedstraw and Weeds in the Pasture – Pasture Walk

By   /  September 13, 2017  /    /  No Comments

Join Grazing Specialist Kimberly Hagen and partners from the VSGA for a pasture walk to learn about how you and your sheep can manage invasive species. There will be a focus on bedstraw and other weeds in the pastures. Are they nutritious? Will my sheep die if they eat these weeds? (No!) How do I […]

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When Livestock Eat Weeds You Have 43% More Forage*

By   /  June 19, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Weeds  /  12 Comments

It’s that time of year when I remind you that you can teach your ruminant livestock to eat your weeds so that you have as much as 43% more forage, and you don’t have to worry about herbicide. Training a group of 50 animals to eat weeds takes just 8 hours spread over 7 days […]

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I Know You Paid A Lot of Money, But It Just Doesn’t Work

By   /  November 16, 2015  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Weeds  /  4 Comments

That’s pretty much what the research, and a decade of experience has shown me about using herbicides to control weeds. More about that, plus an alternative that actually works.

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Cows Eat Leafy Spurge

By   /  November 18, 2013  /  Beef Cattle, Behavior, Dairy Cattle, Livestock, Pasture Health, Weeds  /  Comments Off on Cows Eat Leafy Spurge

Contrary to what you’ve been told, leafy spurge does not cause harm to cattle, and with a little training, they can and will eat it. So why not turn that pest into forage? Here Kathy shares what she’s learned about getting cattle to eat leafy spurge over her decade of teaching cows to eat weeds.

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Multiflora Rose Makes a Great Alternative Forage!

By   /  October 28, 2013  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Weeds  /  4 Comments

Multiflora rose is one of our more beautiful “mistakes.” It was originally introduced from Japan as rootstock for ornamental roses. In the 1930s the U.S. Soil Conservation Service promoted it for erosion control and living fences and farmers took them up on the idea. In the 1960s the Virginia Highway Department planted it in interstate […]

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