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Soil Carbon Cowboys

By   /  January 5, 2015  /  Comments Off on Soil Carbon Cowboys

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Would you like a short visit to summer in the middle of winter? Would you like to meet soil ranchers Allen Williams, Gabe Brown and Neil Dennis? You can with this video.  Great for your next lunch break, here’s 12 minutes in summer pastures, filmed so vibrantly you’ll see grasshoppers jumping in slow motion and almost feel the sun on your face. The three ranchers featured in the video give you an idea of what they’re doing on their operations to improve soil health, and how it’s helping them with their bottom line. And if you ever wanted to see a great how-to on setting up electric fence in a few short minutes, you’ll want to check this out.

Tablet readers, here’s your link.

This video by Peter Byck of Arizona State University introduces upcoming research by ASU’s Soil Carbon Nation research team. They’ll be looking at things like:

• How much carbon is stored in these healthy soils and for how long
• How much methane do the cows burp vs. How much methane do the soil microbes eat?
• How much rainwater soaks into healthy soils?
• Do these soil ranchers make more money than their neighbors?
• And if enough ranchers regenerated their soils, could they slow down climate change?

We’ll watch for more information for you and let you know what they find.

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About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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