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How a Grazing Plan Prevented a Wreck

By   /  January 13, 2020  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  1 Comment

“The pencil is mightier than the pen,” Robert M. Pirsig, of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. “If I’d written my plan in pen, I would have been in trouble!” Troy Bishopp, the Grass Whisperer   Every year, about this time, On Pasture starts reminding our community of the importance of having a plan […]

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Loading Day – Goodbye to 2019

By   /  December 23, 2019  /  Consider This  /  8 Comments

  Here I am; pasture empty, pants dotted with cow manure and a hoof imprint on my calf, standing in an empty pen wondering about my life’s effort as a grass farmer nourishing the land and people. My work seems to be under attack from contributing to climate change to animal welfare issues. It’s an […]

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Can You Please Manage, Pretty Please?! A Grazing Advocate’s Plea

By   /  December 2, 2019  /  Grazing Management, Planning  /  3 Comments

It finally happened; a scream so loud, it echoed throughout the over-grazed hills and valleys of Central New York. Poised on a grassy knoll in “Braveheart” fashion, the Grass Whisperer yells out M-A-N-A-G-E. . . Call it a grazier’s meltdown, or a public service life purge; the agency-sponsored grazing professional and farmer who vehemently tries […]

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Mushroom Foraging – A Pasture Walk and Community Building Opportunity

By   /  November 25, 2019  /  Money Matters  /  1 Comment

  I’ve hosted or participated in pasture walks that feature ice-cream churning, soil health measuring, grassland bird watching, winter grazing techniques, dung beetle counting, stockpiling strategies, land listening, cattle judging and predicting forage production.  They’re all hooks to get folks to attend and focus on learning another aspect of pasturing.  I would suggest adding another […]

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Flannel Shirts and Pumpkin Spice Dreams

By   /  October 21, 2019  /  Consider This  /  1 Comment

Here’s an ode to the winter fabric of farm and ranch life as a sign of the change of seasons.

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