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Adapt or……

By   /  April 21, 2014  /  Comments Off on Adapt or……

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Quotation-Max-Mckeown-evolution-success-improvement-failure-inspirational-innovation-change-Meetville-Quotes-150192This issue of On Pasture is all about adapting:

• Feeding stock through the winter can be hard and expensive. Setting up your grazing plan so you can start stockpiling is a way of adapting so that you can have an easier winter.

• One way to manage weeds is to try to get rid of them.  But is that really a win?  You might want to adapt to what’s in your pasture by just getting your livestock to eat them.

• Forrest Pritchard is now on version 3.0 of how to raise pigs on pasture because he’s been adapting based on what he’s learned. Now he’s sharing all his versions so you can see what fits for you.

• Lyle “Spud” Edwards has had a lot to adapt to over the years. He started with a love of cows and built a whole operation around that, adapting as he went. He’s a great example of resilience at work!

• And then there’s Beer and the threat that climate change may cost us a tasty beverage. We just love how the scientists in this story are searching for solutions and have found ways to help barley to adapt.

mccallum-1Each of these stories is a small example of how people are constantly changing and trying to improve things and that’s what gives us hope. If you’re reading On Pasture, we know that you’re in the middle of that process too.  We’re happy to have you with us, and if you have questions that we might answer about ways you can adapt to make you and your operation more successful, let us know!

Thanks for reading!

Kathy and Rachel

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  • Published: 4 years ago on April 21, 2014
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  • Last Modified: April 21, 2014 @ 10:27 pm
  • Filed Under: The Scoop

About the author

editor and contributor

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she’s not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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