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Shade Is Good For Your Bottom Line

By   /  August 17, 2015  /  1 Comment

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This week we’re sharing the first article in a series by Brett Chedzoy about how to go about a
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About the author

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

1 Comment

  1. Frank Egan says:

    G’day, there is no doubting the benefits of shade for stock during extremes in the weather be they hot or cold.

    But what are the “barriers” to farmers providing this valuable feature for their stock?

    As I understand it much of the US range-land is “rented ” on a year to year basis from private ,State or Fed owned lands,this situation provides no benefit to the renter because of the establishment and on going costs plus the area of woodland will be out of production for approx 5 years so establishment can occur.The area will require some attention as to grazing by pests and water and weed control.Perhaps these barriers are the reason farmers up there resort to “shade sails”,which in reality are of only marginal benefit to the stock,but better than nothing I guess.

    Down here in Aussie most of the land is owned by the farmer freehold or in the case of leasehold in the areas of marginal country to west of the East coast the leases are 99 years and the lease can be traded.There is funding available for providing shade and shelter along with restoring habitat for Native species and the restoration of riparian zones,but this is a article in itself,due to the type and criteria requirements. Frank.

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