Thursday, September 29, 2022
HomePasture HealthForageManure and Bedding Composting for Energy and Fertilizer

Manure and Bedding Composting for Energy and Fertilizer

University of New Hampshire researcher John Aber has been using a Northeast SARE Agroecosystems award to explore the waste streams and energy cycles on an organic dairy farm. The purpose of his research is to help dairy farmers take advantage of manure, bedding, and waste hay by turning it into energy and fertilizer for the farm or for sale. This 3 minute video describes how the on farm composting system works. The heat generated by the composting process is captured and used for farm hot-water demand, accounting for about 20% of the value of the system.

“Composting is a growth industry and this is a very cost effective way to compost and to capture energy created in the process,” says Aber.  Farms can use the compost as a fertilizer and soil amendment or bag it and sell it. For more information on this kind of composting system, you can contact John Aber or Matt Aber, research scientist at UNH’s Organic Dairy Research Farm.

 

Research in California has found that spreading compost on pastures and rangelands is also an excellent way to increase soil carbon sequestration. Dr. Whendee Silver’s results show that spreading a half inch of compost over 5% of California’s rangelands would sequester enough carbon to offset about 65% of the annual greenhouse gas emissions from energy use for commercial and residential sectors in in the state. We’ll be covering more about the results of this research in future issues of On Pasture.

 

Your Tips Keep This Library Online

This resource only survives with your assistance.

Kathy Voth
Kathy Vothhttps://onpasture.com
I am the founder, editor and publisher of On Pasture, now retired. My career spanned 40 years of finding creative solutions to problems, and sharing ideas with people that encouraged them to work together and try new things. From figuring out how to teach livestock to eat weeds, to teaching range management to high schoolers, outdoor ed graduation camping trips with fifty 6th graders at a time, building firebreaks with a 130-goat herd, developing the signs and interpretation for the Storm King Fourteen Memorial trail, receiving the Conservation Service Award for my work building the 150-mile mountain bike trail from Grand Junction, Colorado to Moab, Utah...well, the list is long so I'll stop with, I've had a great time and I'm very grateful.

1 COMMENT

Comments are closed.

Welcome to the On Pasture Library

Free Ebook!

Latest Additions

Most Read

Translate »