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Carbohydrate Reserve Theory: What You Learned Might Be Wrong

By   /  December 3, 2018  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  1 Comment

The authors start with four pieces of information that put the role of carbohydrate reserves into question. Then they share ideas for good grazing to work well with plant physiology.

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Young Animals Experienced With Poor Quality Forage Will Do Better Throughout Life

By   /  May 22, 2017  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  2 Comments

This was originally published in May of 2015. Spring is always a good time to remember this. Many livestock, particularly those making a living on rangelands, encounter poor-quality forages at some point in the grazing season or during the winter, (less than 7% crude protein and 50% TDN). But that doesn’t have to be a problem. We’ve […]

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Even Ruminants Don’t Like to Eat the Same Thing Over and Over Again

By   /  December 19, 2016  /  Behavior, Livestock  /  Comments Off on Even Ruminants Don’t Like to Eat the Same Thing Over and Over Again

Kathy’s Note: You know the feeling – eating the same thing over and over again just gets old. In fact, I remember when I was living in Kodiak, Alaska I got so tired of eating Halibut every night, that no matter what new way I figured to fix it, some nights I just didn’t want […]

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Oregon Rancher Teaches Cows to Eat Sagebrush

By   /  August 22, 2016  /  Grazing Management  /  Comments Off on Oregon Rancher Teaches Cows to Eat Sagebrush

Two weeks ago, Beth wrote about results of studies done by her colleagues at Utah State University on using cattle to graze sagebrush to increase biodiversity on rangelands. This week she shares a story of a rancher who took that information to heart, decided to teach his cows to be sagebrush eaters, and has never […]

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Grazing Sagebrush to Save It

By   /  August 8, 2016  /  Grazing Management, NRCS  /  1 Comment

It’s a problem all over the West: old stands of sagebrush, poor in biodiversity due to lack of disturbance. The increase in sagebrush density over the past century is generally attributed to: 1) reduced numbers of mixed feeders and browsers such as deer, antelope, goats and sheep, 2) increased numbers of cattle and elk, 3) […]

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