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Warm-Season Grasses That Handle Low pH Soils and Hot, Dry Conditions

By   /  October 16, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  No Comments

Native, perennial warm-season grasses produce well compared to cool-season grasses during the hot and dry weather, on soils with low moisture holding capacity, low pH, and low phosphorus levels.

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Does Grazing Sequester Carbon? Part 2 – Some Background

By   /  October 9, 2017  /  Pasture Health, Soil  /  4 Comments

We’re working on a series of articles that explore what the research tells us about grazing and soil carbon sequestration. It’s a complex topic, and as with all things science, there is a lot of background information that may not be covered in the papers themselves. So, before we take a deep dive into the […]

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Does Grazing Sequester Carbon? Part 1

By   /  October 2, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil  /  6 Comments

If you’ve heard that grazing is good for the planet because it can sequester more carbon in the soil, you’re not alone. The hypothesis goes like this: When livestock take a bite of grass, the grass plant sloughs off an equal amount of root mass below ground. That dead material is full of carbon. Microbes […]

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Biodiversity Makes Us Stronger and More Resilient

By   /  September 25, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil, Weeds  /  3 Comments

Biodiversity – like having lots of different plants, bugs and wildlife in our pastures, some of which we might not even like – doesn’t always make managing our grazing  easy. But before we wish away all that “difference,” here’s a story from the news desk at the Smithsonian Institute describing the important role biodiversity can […]

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Easy Ways to Figure Out Your Pasture’s Forage Quality

By   /  September 18, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  Comments Off on Easy Ways to Figure Out Your Pasture’s Forage Quality

Last week we told you why we don’t use Brix to measure the value of forage in pasture. Our primary reason is that it’s not a very reliable tool for looking at the nutritional value of a specific plant. Another reason is that so many people have measured forage value for so long, that you […]

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