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Why Our Incredibly Popular Farmers Market Food Truck Failed

By   /  June 30, 2014  /  2 Comments

Forrest says, “We need a word for: ‘Giving a dream a try, realizing it isn’t the right fit, and gracefully stopping before the dream explodes.’ Here he describes a venture that made him realize just because it’s successful, doesn’t mean you’re doing what you should be doing.

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Although they appear to be cobblestone, the streets of Georgetown University are actually paved with
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About the author

Forrest Pritchard is a professional farmer and writer, holding degrees in English and Geology from the College of William and Mary. His farm Smith Meadows was one of the first “grass finished” farms in the country, and has sold at leading farmers’ markets in Washington DC for more than fifteen years. His book Gaining Ground, A Story of Farmers’ Markets, Local Food and Saving the Family Farm (Click HERE) was named a Top Read by The Washington Post and NPR. Forrest’s new book The Farmer In Your Kitchen: A Celebration Of Extraordinary Farms And Local Flavors is slated for release in Fall 2015, from the award-winning press The Experiment.

2 Comments

  1. Great story
    “exit” plan. That is a way to get out of a business without claiming failure or success. Selling a business or enterprise is a nice way to celebrate an exit. Check out Freakonomics (books or podcast) and see why economists will say “quit fast/quit early”. Failing to quit once the business fails to achieve your goals is a real failure of management decision making. It takes real guts to quit, learn and move on!

  2. Paul Nehring says:

    Forrest,
    I have tremendous respect for what you are accomplishing and the amount of work that you have on your plate–no pun intended. And there is no doubt you were too busy to do it all. So why not just hire it out, or contract the food truck to someone else? In my opinion, the food truck is/was a terrific idea, and well executed, except for one thing…

    One of the mistakes small business owners make is in thinking that they have to do it all themselves. It’s ok to become the leader of your business and hire others to do the work, in fact that’s how good businesses grow, and offer customers more of what they want–your food truck was a wonderful service to your customers. Plus, you also then offer opportunities to others to get into this thing we call sustainable agriculture, and find meaningful employment–not everybody can own and operate a farm. I think you can make it work, but you need to grow into more than just someone who does chores all day, though. You will need to grow into a leader of employees who do much of the work. Your job then is to keep the ship pointed in the right direction, not to swab all the decks and hoist all the sails.

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