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Greg Judy Talks Electric Fencing and Gates for Sheep and Cattle

By   /  May 27, 2019  /  2 Comments

While Greg designed these fences to keep goats, sheep and guardian dogs in, they work for his cattle too. See what he’s using and consider how you’d adapt it to your operation.

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In this 3:30 video, we visit the fence I built in 1999 that is still functioning as sheep pasture. I
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About the author

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Greg and Jan Judy of Clark, Missouri run a grazing operation on 1400 acres of leased land that includes 11 farms. Their successful custom grazing business is founded on holistic, high-density, planned grazing. They run cows, cow/calf pairs, bred heifers, stockers, a hair sheep flock, a goat herd, and Tamworth pigs. They also direct market grass-fed beef, lamb and pork. Greg's popularity as a speaker and author comes from his willingness to describe how anyone can use his grazing techniques to create lush forage, a sustainable environment and a successful business.

2 Comments

  1. Thanks for showing us this fence and gate. What are you using for the electricity source and energizer? What about grounding system?

    Thanks,

    Emily

    • Greg Judy says:

      We use plug-in chargers. Your plug-in chargers are simpler to operate with no need for a solar panel, battery, etc. The brands we use are Cyclops and Stafix.

      Our grounding system is made up of 6′ galvanized ground rods spaced 10′ apart using galvanized clamps to fasten to ground rods.

      We also use hi-tensile 12 gauge wire to fasten all ground rods in series with each other. With 16 Joule and under chargers we use 4 ground rods. All the larger 18-35 joule chargers we use 10 ground rods.

      If you have access to the north side of a building that has a drip line from the roof, this is an ideal spot for your ground rods. Leave 2″ sticking out of the ground to fasten clamps to.

      Areas around ponds make good grounding fields as well. If your fencer is not shocking animals that touch it, usually it points back to an inefficient ground.

      Under an electric fence is also an area that is out of the way where you will not be driving over them or mowing them off!

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