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How Much Grass Do You Have in Your Pasture?

By   /  February 17, 2020  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  No Comments

This week Victor Shelton is answering the question, “How many acres per cow do I need?” Part of his answer is it depends on how much forage you have. Since we all live in different environments that produce different amounts of forage, here’s how you can measure what you’ve got to help you make good […]

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Using Your Herd to Get Manure Spread Onto Your Pastures

By   /  January 27, 2020  /  The Classic by NatGLC  /  1 Comment

This is a Part 3 of a six part series Jim Gerrish wrote on feeding hay in pasture to improve pasture fertility. It goes well with another article this week on the soil benefits of manure. Here are the first two parts of the series: Part 1 and Part 2 . Follow links at the […]

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Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 6

By   /  April 1, 2019  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil  /  1 Comment

This is the last part in Jim’s series. If you missed any part, here are links to catch up: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5. Hay is more Carbon (C) by dry weight than anything else. When we feed hay we are also adding carbon to the soil in addition […]

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Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 5

By   /  March 25, 2019  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil  /  2 Comments

In case you missed them, here are links for previous articles in this series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4. We have so far only considered the role of buying and feeding hay as a Nitrogen source for your pastures. Hay is also a great source for slow-release Phosphorus to benefit your […]

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Feeding Hay to Improve Your Land – Part 4

By   /  March 18, 2019  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil  /  5 Comments

Did you miss the start of this series? Here is Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. Bale grazing has been increasing in popularity for several years now. This method of feeding minimizes or eliminates the need for running any feeding equipment in the winter months, but is it really all sunshine and roses? Let’s […]

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