April 13, 2020

Can We Graze Now?

  Yes, there is green grass. Yes, both you and the livestock are more than eager to utilize it. Yes, you both should wait before grazing it. It is one of the hardest times of the season for some people, me included. We are tired of mud and tired of feeding hay. There is an […]

April 6, 2020

Managing Grazing to Target Cheatgrass and Other Weeds

Thanks for this article go to Ben Beckman, Nebraska Extension Educator, and Mitch Stephenson, UNL Range Management Specialist. They give us an excellent example of what to consider when managing grazing to target cheatgrass. We’ve added some notes on how you can adapt this to other grasses and weeds. Enjoy! While Mother Nature has been […]

March 23, 2020

How Should Livestock Farmers and Horse Owners 
 Prepare for Farm Disruptions from the COVID-19 Outbreak?

This article comes to us from Jim Weber, DVM, PhD, Associate Professor of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Attending Veterinarian, University of Maine. I searched for and added links to additional examples of Standard Operating Procedures to give you a head start on anything you might need to write. Successful farmers, whether they raise cattle, sheep, […]

March 9, 2020

Your FREE Grazing Chart Is Here – Along With All the How-To-Use-It Info You Need

Do you want more quality grazing days? Are you ready to make more money? Are you dealing with weather events proactively? Do you want to limit stress points in your operation? Would you like to get away for a vacation this summer? If you need help with any of these things, then check out the […]

February 10, 2020

How a Blue Ridge Farmer Set Up His Rotational Grazing System

John Fant, Colonel, US Army (Ret), returned to southwest Virginia in 2013 to resume daily operations and management of the family farm. In this 6:52 video, John describes how he assessed the farm’s resources and then developed and implemented a plan that would improve water quality, and soil and animal health. What he found was […]

January 27, 2020

Here’s the Impact of Fencing and Planning on Grazing Days and Profitability

In November I shared thoughts on the economic importance of stockpiling grass. In that article, I made the case for building internal fence on a new property because of the economic value of the grass. Well, we did build the fences even though we were sick of fencing by November! This article covers what happened […]

December 9, 2019

Some Dos and Don’ts of Setting Up a Grazing Operation

I want to discuss the steps that we focus on when designing a new grazing operation on a new farm, starting with this saying: “If you have a lot of money, act like you don’t.” (If you don’t have a bunch of money ignore this.) The point is, being successful in a previous career is […]

December 2, 2019

Can You Please Manage, Pretty Please?! A Grazing Advocate’s Plea

It finally happened; a scream so loud, it echoed throughout the over-grazed hills and valleys of Central New York. Poised on a grassy knoll in “Braveheart” fashion, the Grass Whisperer yells out M-A-N-A-G-E. . . Call it a grazier’s meltdown, or a public service life purge; the agency-sponsored grazing professional and farmer who vehemently tries […]

November 25, 2019

What in Tar(weed)nation?! Part 2 – The Nature of Your Enemy and the Nature of Nature

Last week, I wrote about how tarweed showed up on my ranch a few years back, and how the management that had worked so well in the past seemed to fail me. In the end, I realized I needed to know more about my opponent. So here’s what I learned. I hope you’ll use it […]

November 4, 2019

You Don’t Have to Practice Yoga to Be a Flexible Grazier!

In most livestock operations, the largest expense is winter feed. As a grazier, it has been my goal to plan a grazing rotation so there is high quality, high volume forage available in the fall and winter. This fall has tested my flexibility once again and has once again shown me the importance of having […]

October 21, 2019

Untoward Acceleration – the Greatest Danger to Graziers

We all make grazing management mistakes. The key to improving is to acknowledge what they are, why they happened, and then what we might do differently next time. Here, Troy Bishopp shares a mistake from his grazing past, as an example of these steps to improvement.

September 16, 2019

Could This Winter Be as Wet as Last? Here’s How to Prepare

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has released their forecast for this winter. “Mild, with soakers” is how Indiana is labeled. I don’t put a lot of weight on these forecasts, but they often line up with other forecasts and occasionally are completely correct. If this forecast holds true, I think we all need to prepare for […]

September 9, 2019

When High Density Hurts: Remediating Overgrazed Land

I am a complete believer in mob (high-density rotational) grazing. I have seen marginal land explode with productivity and vigor after a properly orchestrated high-density kick in the rear. But like any tool, misuse can turn animal impact into a powerful force for destruction. There are some situations in grazing when you should not use […]

September 2, 2019

Ranching By Number

  On more than one occasion I have made disparaging comments about the tendency of our ranching industry to waste time gathering data. We keep spiral-bound notebooks full of all kinds of information, most of which is fairly useless. Folks who are in the business of producing purebred breeding stock may be compelled to gather […]

August 5, 2019

We’re Stockpiling Now for Winter Grazing at Green Pastures Farm

We have 70 days left until our average killing frost date. That means we’re starting to stockpile now to extend our grazing season, allowing pastures to grow so we won’t have to feed hay this winter. For most folks winter feeding is their largest expense and can be the difference between making a profit or […]

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