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Artificial Calamari From Pork Bung?

By   /  March 19, 2013  /  Comments Off on Artificial Calamari From Pork Bung?

After I was done laughing at the idea, I began to wonder, “Why not?”  The Locavore movement promotes using every bit of the animal for food.  Are we on the cusp of a new market?  You tell me.

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A while ago, a farmer walked through a pork processing plant in Oklahoma with a friend who managed it. He came across boxes stacked on the floor with labels that said “artificial calamari.” So he asked his friend “What’s artificial calamari?” “Bung,” his friend replied. “Hog rectum.”

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Have you or I eaten bung dressed up as seafood? In Episode 484 of “This American Life” reporter Ben Calhoun investigates. After exhaustive research and questioning everyone he can find, Ben never arrives at a definitive answer to the question “are restaurants actually substituting pork bung for calamari?”

Ben then decides the real question is CAN pork bung pass as Calamari? There was only one way to know for sure. He had to cook up some bung and eat it. And if the taste was overwhelming and the texture was all wrong, well, then he’d have his answer.

“And at this point, I’ll be frank,” Ben says, “I started to root for the bung. I realized that this is not a story about fraud. It’s not a bait and switch story.  It’s a story about possibility. It’s classic rags to riches. It’s about whether a cut of meat– perhaps the lowliest, most malignable cut of meat in America– might somehow, in at least one place on the planet, be dipped in the redemptive oils of the great culinary equalizer that is the deep fryer.  And it might emerge transformed, no longer an outcast, but instead hair combed, clean shaven, in a suit and tie. It might walk reborn onto a table. Through sheer force of resemblance, it might be loved. Its history, years of drudgery and hardship, doing the body’s least glamorous job, all washed away.”

Calamari on one side of the plate, sliced hog rectums on the other. Which is which?

Calamari on one side of the plate, sliced hog rectums on the other. Which is which?

Ben tells such a great story, that I don’t want to ruin it by telling you the ending.  So here’s the link to Episode 484.  Scroll down the page to Act One “Dead Ringer” and click on the arrow pointing to the right to play this part of the podcast.

Our “Consider This” articles are all about looking at things in a new light. If you have suggestions about things we might explore and present, let us know.

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P.S. Want to know the answer? Send me an email and I’ll tell you the outcome. 🙂

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About the author

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

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