Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Grazing Management  >  Current Article

Forage Analysis of Stockpiled Pasture at the Grass Whisperer’s Place

By   /  December 16, 2013  /  2 Comments

Troy is home and healing, and has invited you on this mini-pasture walk of winter-grazing at his place. Here are lots of great pictures of his animals in action, along with the forage results for his stockpiled pasture and the sedges that the cattle like to eat this time of year.

    Print       Email
Stockpiled pasture at Troy's with the cattle grazing in the background.  All photos by Troy Bishopp.

Stockpiled pasture at Troy’s with the cattle grazing in the background. All photos by Troy Bishopp.

Thought you all would be interested in these recent forage samples I took of stockpiled pasture in paddock 16.  It’s the second to last paddock to finish the season out and is 107 days old.  It is remarkable the quality and energy value even at this late date in upstate New York. I’m also wondering how much having this field fallowed 2 years ago for the grassland birds and then mob-grazed plays a part.

Here are the forage test results.  Click to see full size

Here are the forage test results. Click to see full size

I also sent in a sample is of rushes (looks like a green needle) that the cows readily eat after frost.  I’ve always been interested why they devour these wetland plants so much in winter and what nutrition these basically hollow, freeze-dried plants have.  I see they are really high in Manganese and Molybdeum.  A Relative Feed Value of 94 is also not bad.

Anyway, as my body heals from the heart attack, I still like to think, so if you have any insights on these samples drop me a note.  I’ll be finishing up grazing next Wednesday which will be about 230 days of grazing.  I still need to figure out how to graze the other 135 days.
The ground is frozen so it will be awesome feeding hay out on the pastures without the damage.  Looks like we are into a snowy pattern so my grazing plan to be nearer the barn this time of year is working like a champ. Sometimes you catch a break.
The cattle don't mind the white stuff.

The cattle don’t mind the white stuff.

Grazed and unglazed pastures

Grazed and unglazed pastures

Classic Winter-Grazing Beard

Classic Winter-Grazing Beard

Classic Winter-Grazing Beard

Classic Winter-Grazing Beard

Mmm….good grass

Mmm….good grass

Even the dog is figuring this out!

Even the dog is figuring this out!

 

Stockpiled grass for winter-grazing

Stockpiled grass for winter-grazing

Winter Stockpiled Grass

 

 

    Print       Email

About the author

contributor

Troy Bishopp, aka “The Grass Whisperer” is an accomplished professional grazier of 27 years, grasslands advocate and media guy who owns and manages Bishopp Family Farm in Deansboro, NY with his understanding wife, daughters and parents. Their certified organic custom grazing operation raises dairy heifers, grass-finished beef and backgrounds feeder cattle on 180 acres of owned and leased organic native pastures. The whisperer routinely asks customers, Is there any grass in the animal products you buy? Beef grazed on the farm has been served at President Obama’s inaugural dinners, restaurants and to diners as far away as Japan. Troy also works for the Madison County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Upper Susquehanna Coalition as their regional grazing specialist and is a free-lance writer, maintaining a website presence at www.thegrasswhisperer.com

2 Comments

  1. Jim Hayes says:

    Troy,
    I have done a number of forage test this time of the year.They have all been good but the best were always when we had an early snow cover.Forage with a RFV of 130 would cost close to $200/T or more on a DM basis.Every day my 100 ewes are out there I am probably saving close to $50.
    Today 12/20 I have about 10 days of grazing left but have been feeding hay for the last 4 days due to greater than a foot of snow currently on the ground. It is close to 50 degrees today they will be out tomorrow and be very happy.
    Jim

  2. Dave Scott says:

    Howdy, Toy,
    I surely hope you are doing better.
    Were the samples taken recently? They are quite good, I would say, for this time of year. no wonder your critters are doing well.

    Happy holidays to you and yours,

    Dave

You might also like...

Looking Drought in the Eye – Working Together to Get Through the Next One

Read More →