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Greg Judy’s Stockpiling and Grazing Advice for Kentucky 31 Fescue

By   /  October 15, 2018  /  1 Comment

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Here’s a 3:14 video from Greg Judy talking about Kentucky 31 fescue and red clover. He starts off saying, “It’s probably the best forage in Missouri, if you learn how to manage it, especially for winter grazing.”

Some folks say that you can’t grow red clover with Kentucky 31 and that Kentucky 31 crowds it out. But that’s not Greg’s experience. He’ll show you plenty of red clover, and some white too mixed in with his pastures, and he talks about how he grazes it to make it work for him.

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How Does Red Clover Solve Fescue Problems?

Greg’s experience with red clover reducing the toxicity of fescue matches what science has found. This article from March of 2018 describes what’s in red clover and what we now know about how it protects livestock from fescue and even increases weight gain. If you’d like more information on how to get red clover growing in your pastures, check out this article from Genevieve Slocum and Kingsagriseeds.

 

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About the author

contributor

Greg and Jan Judy of Clark, Missouri run a grazing operation on 1400 acres of leased land that includes 11 farms. Their successful custom grazing business is founded on holistic, high-density, planned grazing. They run cows, cow/calf pairs, bred heifers, stockers, a hair sheep flock, a goat herd, and Tamworth pigs. They also direct market grass-fed beef, lamb and pork. Greg's popularity as a speaker and author comes from his willingness to describe how anyone can use his grazing techniques to create lush forage, a sustainable environment and a successful business.

1 Comment

  1. Curt Gesch says:

    Thanks, Greg. Better to look at grass and clover than talking heads at conferences! 🙂 Your enthusiasm is infectious.

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