Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Grazing Management  >  Current Article

Rotational Grazing System Increases Profit and Resilience

By   /  May 4, 2020  /  Comments Off on Rotational Grazing System Increases Profit and Resilience

    Print       Email

“With rotational grazing, what really turned me onto it and got me into it was, honestly, the economic value of it, obviously in dollar signs. I was thinking, “Oh, if we do rotational grazing I automatically should be able to put so many more pairs on a piece of pasture. That’s true to a certain extent, but equally, if not more beneficial, is just how healthy the grass is and how the grass can respond during a drought.”

That’s Lance Vilhauer of Mina, South Dakota. In this 5:33 video, he takes us on a tour of his operation, showing how he works on easements purchased from Ducks Unlimited to use cross fencing and rotational grazing to produce more and better forage.

The purchased parcels, coming out of the Conservation Reserve Program, benefited from animal impact.  Valeree Devine, NRCS District Conservationist, describes how adding cattle at the right time revives tired grasses, builds more roots, and improves conditions in the soil.

Valeree and Lance agree that it’s important to switch things up. Says Valeree, “When you do the same thing over and over again, the system gets lazy.”

Check out what Lance does with his grazing system and listen to his thoughts on the importance of rangeland and grazing for taking carbon out of the air and improving water quality.

 

 

    Print       Email

About the author

Publisher, Editor and Author

Kathy worked with the Bureau of Land Management for 12 years before founding Livestock for Landscapes in 2004. Her twelve years at the agency allowed her to pursue her goal of helping communities find ways to live profitably AND sustainably in their environment. She has been researching and working with livestock as a land management tool for over a decade. When she's not helping farmers, ranchers and land managers on-site, she writes articles, and books, and edits videos to help others turn their livestock into landscape managers.

You might also like...

Grazing Through Drought, Too Much Rain, and Fire

Read More →