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Reader Questions and Answers About Fall Alfalfa Nutrition, Varieties, and Reseeding

By   /  November 27, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  2 Comments

We’ve been getting alfalfa-related questions from readers. Genevieve Slocum and David Hunsberger of King’s Agriseeds have some answers. Question: My cows and calves have been on a pasture for about a week with approx. 50% grass 50% alfalfa it has dried down on the stem and we have had -2 c frosts several times some […]

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When Can You Start Grazing A New Planting?

By   /  August 28, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  1 Comment

Here’s a response from Genevieve at Kings Agriseeds for a reader who asked: “When can you start grazing a new planting? What if it’s an oats/peas combo, or some other mix? How do you know it’s good to graze? What is a good way to manage it?” Timing to start grazing varies for each species […]

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The Summer Annual Manual

By   /  June 5, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  Comments Off on The Summer Annual Manual

Summer annuals have unique benefits, like filling a small space in the rotation with multiple cuttings of big yields. They also bring some unique challenges and considerations. Here’s what you need to know. Step 1 is waiting for warm soils. These crops are adapted to hot climates and won’t germinate consistently until soil is at […]

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Seeing the Pasture for the Trees

By   /  April 24, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health  /  2 Comments

Shade is a common concern. It imposes some limitations on growing a productive pasture, but working creatively to manage trees, grass, and animals in balance can yield unique rewards.

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Why Inoculate, Exactly?

By   /  March 13, 2017  /  Forage, Pasture Health, Soil  /  Comments Off on Why Inoculate, Exactly?

That little packet of dark powder you are coerced into purchasing along with your clover seed can be mystifying. It only weighs a few ounces, and it has to be kept cool and dry and managed like a living pet (it is, after all, alive). Plus it invariably gets all over your hands and clothes. […]

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